RTube™

Exhaled Breath Condensate Collector
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RTubeVOC™

End Tidal Air Collector for Volatile Organic Compounds
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RTube VENT™

Exhaled Breath Condensate Collector for Intubated Patient Use
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VOC Analyzer

Portable Mass Spectrometer for VOC Analysis
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Exhaled Biomarker Collection and Analysis

We know breath research. Our RTube product line has been used over 200,000 times to capture exhaled biomarkers in academic, pharmaceutical, and government research studies since 2001. No other company has continuously supported the breath research community as long as we have, and we are very proud to have earned the trust of researchers worldwide. From product innovation to protocol development to logistical support, we’ll do everything we can to help you get the best possible study results.
RTube

RTube

Exhaled Breath Condensate Collector
Disposable hand-held breath condensate collector for use any time, any where.
RTubeVOC

RTubeVOC

End Tidal Air Collector for Volatile Organic Compounds.
Disposable single-breath collector selectively captures the last 65 ml of exhalate.
RTubeVENT

RTubeVENT

Exhaled Breath Condensate Collector for Intubated Patient Use.
Disposable breath condensate collector for in-line use in ventilator expiratory limb.
Analysis

Analysis

Biomarker Analysis and Lab Services.
Equip your lab with the latest technology or utilize our mail-in laboratory service.

Starter Kits

Get preliminary data for your grant application quickly and inexpensively with these all-inclusive Starter Kits.

RTube™

25 Collection Starter Kit
$1110/Starter Kit
  • Breath Condensate
  • Gas-Phase Breath
  • Ambulatory Population
  • Intubated/Ventilated Population
  • DNA, RNA, miRNA
  • Proteins
  • Deep Lung Volatile Organic Compounds
  • pH
  • Oxides of Nitrogen
  • Water-Soluble Volatiles
  • Non-Water-Soluble Volatiles
  • Arachidonic Acid Metabolites
  • Cytokines
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RTubeVOC™

25 Collection Starter Kit
$1096/Starter Kit
  • Breath Condensate
  • Gas-Phase Breath
  • Ambulatory Population
  • Intubated/Ventilated Population
  • DNA, RNA, miRNA
  • Proteins
  • Deep Lung Volatile Organic Compounds
  • pH
  • Oxides of Nitrogen
  • Water-Soluble Volatiles
  • Non-Water-Soluble Volatiles
  • Arachidonic Acid Metabolites
  • Cytokines
Buy Now

RTubeVENT™

25 Collection Starter Kit
$1315/Starter Kit
  • Breath Condensate
  • Gas-Phase Breath
  • Ambulatory Population
  • Intubated/Ventilated Population
  • DNA, RNA, miRNA
  • Proteins
  • Deep Lung Volatile Organic Compounds
  • pH
  • Oxides of Nitrogen
  • Water-Soluble Volatiles
  • Non-Water-Soluble Volatiles
  • Arachidonic Acid Metabolites
  • Cytokines
Buy Now

Planning a Clinical Study?

We can help with study methods development, protocol writing and review, and logistics planning.
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Featured Video

A Simple Method for Comparing Cytokine Levels in Breath

Measuring cytokine levels in Exhaled Breath Condensate (EBC) continues to be a major objective of breath research. However, there are often substantial data reporting and interpretation differences between research groups making comparisons between studies difficult. In his recent editorial entitled “Understanding new ‘‘exploratory’’ biomarker data: a first look at observed concentrations and associated detection limits” , Joachim D. Pleil of the National Exposure Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency outlines a simple technique to quantify and interpret biomarkers levels in EBC. The distribution and range of cytokines in EBC as well as the detection limit of the instrument are often unknown in these exploratory biomarker data sets.  This can make direct comparisons within and between studies difficult. Dr. Pleil initially applies simple statistical tools in organizing these data. Given a list of measurements data for each particular analyte, he orders them from lowest to highest and determines which measurement values are positioned as minimum, maximum, and the 5th, 25th, 50th, 75th, 95th (etc.) percentiles. From this a simple table is constructed. One of Dr. Pleil’s examples is a set of EBC cytokine measurements using a new immunochemistry platform (MesoScale Discovery, MSD, Gaithersburg, MD) detailed in a prior publication entitled “Analysis of inflammatory cytokines in human blood, breath condensate, and urine using a multiplex immunoassay platform” by Stiegel et. al. These data are tabulated in the editorial and show that: Most EBC specimens had measurable levels of the selected cytokines above the estimated lower level of quantification (LLOQ) Measurements ranged from 0.058 pg/ml to 222 pg/ml depending on the analyte Quartile ranges for different cytokines varied... read more

MicroRNA in Exhaled Breath May Help Predict Lung Cancer

New research from the University of California San Francisco suggests how non-invasive breath tests could predict a patient’s likelihood of developing lung cancer. Dr. Daya Upadhyay, Medical Director of the Lung Nodule Program at UCSF, presented her findings at the 2015 American Thoracic Society’s International Conference held in Denver. She focused on MicroRNA (miRNA), a small non-coding RNA molecule found in plants, animals and some viruses, which influences how genes turn on and off. Dr. Upadhyay’s work tallied miRNA captured in patients’ Exhaled Breath Condensate (EBC). EBC contains droplets of Airway Lining Fluid swept up by turbulence as exhaled air passes over the cells lining the airway. These tiny droplets carry a soupy mix of cell fragments and numerous molecules including miRNA. Several variants of Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) analysis can determine miRNA levels in EBC. Continuing advances in PCR-based analytical tools now provide the researcher high sensitivity and specificity for identifying miRNA’s even at very low concentrations. Using these techniques, her group identified a candidate miRNA panel which may predict susceptibility of an individual to lung cancer, help stratify disease progression and differentiate types of cancer. Examining miRNA in samples of exhaled breath may become especially useful as part of a patient management strategy where a simple non-invasive breath test helps doctors select the patients most at risk of developing lung cancer. These patients, even if completely asymptomatic, can then be examined more closely using diagnostic tests such as Computerized Axial Tomography (CAT) scans whereas they may otherwise have simply continued on with routine clinical observation. This could lead to earlier detection of lung cancer and significantly improve... read more

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